Co-authors James A. Hessler and Britt Isenberg will present and sign copies of their book Gettysburg’s Peach Orchard: Longstreet, Sickles, and the Bloody Fight for the “Commanding Ground” Along the Emmitsburg Road at various venues in Gettysburg.

• Friday, June 21, from 5:30 to 8 p.m., Gallery 30, 26 York St. For more information, visit www.gallery30.com.

• Sunday, June 30, from 5 to 7 p.m., Gettysburg Heritage Center, 2979 Steinwehr Ave. For more information, visit www.gettysburgmuseum.com.

• Friday, July 5, 1–5 p.m., Gettysburg National Military Park Museum & Visitor Center, 1195 Baltimore Park. For more information, call (717)334-2288.

• Sunday, July 7, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Gettysburg National Military Park Museum & Visitor Center.

More books have been written about the battle of Gettysburg than any other engagement of the Civil War. The historiography of the battle’s second day is usually dominated by the Union’s successful defense of Little Round Top, but the day’s most influential action occurred nearly one mile west along the Emmitsburg Road in farmer Joseph Sherfy’s peach orchard, according to a press release announcing the authors’ book signings.

Despite its overriding importance, no full-length study of this pivotal action has been written until now. Hessler and Isenberg’s book corrects that oversight.

On July 2, 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee ordered skeptical subordinate Lt. Gen. James Longstreet to launch a massive assault against the Union left flank. The offensive was intended to seize the Peach Orchard and surrounding ground along the Emmitsburg Road for use as an artillery position to support the ongoing attack. However, Union Maj. Gen. Daniel Sickles, a scheming former congressman from New York, misinterpreted his orders and occupied the orchard first.

This richly detailed study is based upon scores of primary accounts and a deep understanding of the terrain. Hessler and Isenberg, both Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guides, combine the military aspects of the fighting with human interest stories in a balanced treatment of the bloody attack and defense of Gettysburg’s Peach Orchard.

About the authors

James A. Hessler is a Licensed Battlefield Guide at Gettysburg. He is the award-winning author of Sickles at Gettysburg (Savas Beatie, 2009), the recipient of the Bachelder Coddington Award and Gettysburg Civil War Round Table Distinguished Book Award, and co-author of Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg (Savas Beatie, 2015). His media appearances include Travel Channel, NPR, PCN-TV, Breitbart News, Civil War Radio, and Gettysburg Daily. He was a primary content designer for the Civil War Trust’s mobile Gettysburg application and has written several articles for publication. He lives with his wife and family in Gettysburg.

Britt C. Isenberg is a full-time Licensed Battlefield Guide at Gettysburg National Military Park since 2014. He has been published in several Civil War periodicals through writing and photography, and is the author of The Boys Fought Like Demons (2016), a regimental history of the 105th Pennsylvania Infantry. His tours at Gettysburg have also been featured on PCN-TV. Originally from Millersburg, Pa., he resides with his wife and daughter near Gettysburg.

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