States mostly defer to union guidance for on-set gun safety

FILE - In this Wednesday, April 17, 2002, file photo, items from the National Firearms Museum exhibit of guns and memorabilia used in movies, such as Clint Eastwood's gun and badge from "Dirty Harry," are shown at the NRA Headquarters in Fairfax, Va. Guns used in making movies are sometimes real weapons that can fire either bullets or blanks, which are gunpowder charges that produce a flash and a bang but no deadly projectile. Even blanks can eject hot gases and paper or plastic wadding from the barrel that can be lethal at close range.

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